Naming Your Chameleon: Sci-Fi Edition

Every pet deserves a great name, and your chameleon is no exclusion. But what exactly makes a great chameleon name? Sure, you can choose a variety of standby options, but isn’t it better to have a little fun?

With that in mind, we present the first part in a chameleon naming series geared to those with specific interests. And, in this case, we are referring to science fiction.

While there are certain classic options included in this list, we have also added some that might not be as well known as others. If these specific names don’t meet your needs, we hope they inspire you to consider all of the options available to you when it comes to naming your chameleon. So, without any further ado, let’s get started.

Admiral Ackbar – Star Wars

Admiral Ackbar is a classic Star Wars character, most famously known for identifying the trap at the Battle of Endor (and the classic line of dialogue “It’s a trap!” that has made itself known across a wide range of popular media).

Aside from being a well-recognized character in the franchise, the character also has a look that shares some similarities to chameleons. His eyes provide a wide range of vision, and the character has no obvious external ears. He also has an appearance that resembles that of a reptile or amphibian species.

But the best reason to choose this as a name is really the fact that it’s fun to say Admiral Ackbar in serious tones.

Keenser – Star Trek

Now, it wouldn’t be appropriate to have Star Wars represented without also finding a suitable name from another great sci-fi franchise, Star Trek. And that is where Keenser comes in.

Keenser is the small alien best known for his connection to Montgomery Scott in the newest iterations of the Star Trek movies. His skin texture has a reptile-like appearance, and his eyes lack discernable irises. Additionally, his character lacks dialogue, meaning all of his emotions require reading his body language, not unlike dealing with a pet chameleon.

Ocheeva and Teinaava – Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion

For those who are fans of the Elder Scrolls video game franchise, you may appreciate naming your chameleon after a well-known Argonian from the games. In this case, we settled on Ocheeva, a leader of the Dark Brotherhood in Oblivion, as well as her twin brother, Teinaava. These characters play notable roles for anyone who followed the Dark Brotherhood storyline within the game and, since the Argonian race is reptilian in nature, their names make excellent choices.

Greedo – Star Wars

Another Star Wars character that has reptilian characteristics is Greedo, the Rodian bounty hunter most known for his part in the infamous showdown with Han Solo that continues to prompt the debate of who shot first.

While Greedo’s eye placement, and the presence of discernable ears, don’t necessarily mirror a chameleons, the fact that the eyes don’t display traditional irises around pupils can be seen as a similarity. And, if your chameleon is one that happens to have a voracious appetite or is particular defensive regarding his or her personal space, the fact that “greed” is part of the name may make it even more ideal.

Honorable Mentions

Some other characters within the larger sci-fi universe worth mentioning include:

  • Dachande – Predator in Alien vs. Predator mythology that is best known for being the first Predator to face a xenomorph in unarmed combat and survive.
  • Jeriba and Zammis Shigan – aliens in the film Enemy Mine
  • Dr. Lazarus – fictional name of the sci-fi character played in Galaxy Quest by actor Alan Rickman

There are likely many more potential names from sci-fi to choose from, but hopefully, these options gave you some inspiration. Look for future installments in the “Naming Your Chameleon” series for inspiration taken from other areas of literature, television, film, and more.

Pets and Improved Mental Health: It’s Not Just for Cats and Dogs

It is fairly well-known that having a pet can provide significant mental health benefits. But, when we read the studies or see the news clips, the coverage mostly relates to owning cats or dogs, and not often more exotic pets like chameleons. However, owning any pet can be beneficial to your mental health. And that includes our unique chameleon friends.

So, how can owning a chameleon help your mental health? Let me count the ways!

1. Pets Soothe and Relax

Most studies show that pet owners have lower blood pressure and heart rates when dealing with challenging mental stresses. This could pertain to everyday situations like paying bills, helping children with their homework, or watching your favorite sports team getting knocked out of the playoffs. Just their presence can relax and soothe their owners, regardless of whether they are of the furry variety or not.

In fact, one piece of research demonstrated a connection between lower stress and simply watching a fish tank, even when the fish didn’t belong to the individual being observed. And, if you want to talk about a pet that can’t provide physical affection, then a fish is likely the epitome of that. Yet, their presence is enough to cause a positive reaction.

2. Pets Don’t Judge

Another benefit that applies to any pet, including chameleons, is that they don’t judge their owners. There is no negative feedback about the decisions you made, the clothes you wear, or the quality of your resume. And that means we can say anything in their presence without fear of ridicule or reprisal. In some cases, that is more than we can say of our closest friends, so it’s no wonder so many people cite feeling as close to their pets as some of their friends and family members.

3. Pets Give Us Purpose

Research on depression has shown that the responsibility of owning a pet is beneficial to mental health. We develop skills in caring for our animal brethren, and we know that we are being relied on for their care. By managing the tasks successfully, our self-esteem can improve. It also ensures that we maintain a particular schedule, as not getting out of bed and skipping a feeding, misting, or cleaning isn’t necessarily an option.

4. Chameleons Help Fill a Gap

Therapy animals have been on the mental health scene for some time. But that doesn’t mean everyone wants to own a traditional fuzzy creature like a cat or dog. In fact, someone suffering from serious allergies to cats or dogs may actually find their mental state worse with this form of animal companion and not better. And that’s where some of the more exotic choices come in.

Chameleons, snacks, toads, and other reptiles and amphibians give options to those who aren’t as enthusiastic about owning a furry friend. And that means those individuals can get the companionship they need to relieve stress, anxiety, and depression in the same way that many others do.

And that, my friend, is a beautiful thing.

http://usherp.org/tag/therapy-reptiles/

https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/health-benefits/index.html

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2013/05/19/6-ways-pets-relieve-depression/

How to Introduce a Child to Your Chameleon

Whether you have your own children or have friends or family members with kids, introducing a child to your chameleon for the first time can be a stressful experience for everyone involved (including your chameleon!).

It’s only natural that children would be curious about your chameleon, as they are truly fascinating creatures. But young kids don’t always understand that how they treat their dog or cat and how you handle a chameleon is different.

To help you make the introductions a pleasant experience for all parties, here are some tips to manage their first hello.

Step One: Make No Promises

You know that chameleons are not always the most fond of being handled, and are generally not considered to be physically affectionate at all. However, kids who aren’t familiar with reptiles might not realize this fact.

If a child asks if they can touch (hold or carry or hug) you chameleon, your first step is to make no promises. Whether any physical contact will be possible depends on how your chameleon reacts as the introduction moves forward. Obviously, if you chameleon exhibits signs of stress while within the safety of their habitat, it isn’t wise to push your luck. Chameleons may bite when scared or threatened, so it isn’t a good idea to rush contact if your chameleon doesn’t seem game.

Step Two: A Sight-Only Introduction

The first step to introducing a child to your chameleon needs to involve the eyes only. Allow them to observe each other while your chameleon stays in his or her enclosure. Make sure that the kid keeps their hands away from the habitat, avoids quick movements, and that they maintain a reasonable volume.

This step helps you gauge your chameleon’s response to a new person in your space. It also lets you see how the child will react as they get closer.

Some kids will have issues containing their excitement, which may cause them to move unexpected or exclaim their enthusiasm. Since children can be as unpredictable as your chameleon when exposed to something new, it is better to take the slow and steady approach.

Step Three: A Chance to Touch

If your chameleon is keeping a fairly calm demeanor, then it might be possible for the child to touch the chameleon, but only if you can safely remove your chameleon from the enclosure. Use whatever handling technique traditionally works best, and make sure the child stays back a bit while you see if your chameleon is up for some handling.

Once (or if) your chameleon is safely removed, continue keeping things slow. It will help kids keep themselves calm if you keep your level of energy down. Monitor your chameleon’s reaction as you bring them closer, and make sure to reverse course if signs of stress appear.

If everything continues favorably, then you can invite the child to gently touch your chameleon. Make sure they keep the pressure light, and that their hand is clearly within the chameleon’s view as they move forward. Additionally, have the kid keep their motions slow to avoid starting your chameleon along the way.

Once a short contact has been made, you can determine whether any additional handling is an option. Stay with them both to make sure everything remains calm and peaceful. After a few minutes, even if things still seem to be going well, feel free to bring your chameleon back to the enclosure.

With any luck, by taking things slow and steady, you’ll have a successful introduction. Just remember, you have a duty to your chameleon as well as the child during this meet and greet. Ultimately, the most important part is to keep everyone involved safe and secure and, if that means cutting an introduction short, then that’s for the best.

 

 

http://www.muchadoaboutchameleons.com/2012/04/to-handle-or-not-to-handle.html

http://www.reptilesmagazine.com/Lizard-Care/Handling-Chameleons/

http://thereptilereport.com/how-to-handle-a-chameleon/

Oh, You Shouldn’t Have: Reasons to Think Twice Before Giving a Pet as a Gift

With the holiday season in full swing, you may be running out of steam when it comes to gift ideas. Then, you remember that friend or family member that expressed so much interested in your chameleon and you wonder, “Should I give them a chameleon as a gift?”

While the idea of giving someone a chameleon (or any pet) as a gift initially seems like an awesome idea, it is better to think twice before going forward. To help you determine if giving a pet as a gift is a good idea, consider these points first.

Do They Want a Pet?

The first step before giving a pet as a gift is determining if the recipient even wants one in the first place. Just because a person admires and enjoys your pet doesn’t mean they want one in their own home. Some people aren’t in the best place for bringing an animal into their lives, while others may have no interest in actually owning a pet at all. You don’t want to give a pet to a person that doesn’t actually want one, as that can be unfair to both the recipient and the animal for which they will soon have to care.

Are They Allowed to Have a Pet?

Rules about pets in rental properties can be very strict. Some types of pets will be banned outright, while others must meet certain restrictions. Sometimes, the information is covered clearly in a person’s lease, especially when it comes to common pets like cats and dogs. However, more exotic pets, including chameleons, may not be covered as explicitly. That means a call to the landlord may be in order. Since it would be inappropriate for you to take this on yourself, it is better not to surprise any renter with an unexpected pet.

Can They Afford the Costs?

A pet costs more than its purchase price. You may need to get a suitable habitat, and you will definitely need to pay for food and other basic necessities. While relieving someone of the cost associated with buying a pet can be helpful, the gift essentially saddles the person with a long-term financial obligation. If you don’t know for a fact that this is a burden they will happily take on, then bypass this gift idea, at least for the time being.

Do They Have the Time?

Even if they want a pet and are allowed to have one, that doesn’t mean the timing is right. If someone travels a lot for work, having a pet at home may not be practical. Even though some pets, like chameleons, don’t require a lot of interaction, that doesn’t mean it should be left unattended long-term. This is particularly the case if the local climate doesn’t resemble the chameleon’s natural climate, as greater care is required to ensure the environment meets their needs.

Similarly, if the recipient may be moving soon, giving them a pet may make that process more complicated. This is especially true for anyone who may move to a state or country where exotic pets aren’t allowed or people who may find themselves in a college dorm soon.

Did You Check with Them (or Their Parents) First?

Before giving a pet as a gift, it is better to get permission than to hope it will work out. For adult recipients, consider asking them directly. While you may think it spoils the surprise, they will be elated if the gift is the right choice for them and their life now, and may be relieved that you didn’t surprise them with a pet if it isn’t a good time.

When it comes to giving pets as gifts to children, always check with the parents before going forward. While a child may promise to manage all of the associated care, unless they have their own source of money, at least some of the support will be coming from another member of the household. You want to make sure that they are onboard with the idea before even suggesting it to the child.

The Decision

If everything reviewed above checks out, then giving a pet as a gift might be the right choice. However, if there is any hesitation, it is better to go with plan B. A pet is a huge responsibility, and it shouldn’t be given to another person lightly. When in doubt, consider giving a book about the care of their ideal pet, or a gift certificate that can be used to help them prepare for bringing a pet into their lives. This is an area where it is better to be safe than sorry.

 

 

 

http://www.petguide.com/tips-advice/dog/why-you-shouldnt-give-pets-as-gifts-this-christmas/

http://www.bhg.com/pets/adoption/the-best-gift-you-can-give-waiting-to-adopt-until-after-the-holidays/

https://www.paws.org/get-involved/take-action/explore-the-issues/pets-as-gifts/

 

No Place Like Home | Creating Your Chameleon Habitat Part 4

This is part four of a multipart series about creating an ideal habitat for your chameleon. The previous parts covered choosing an enclosure, selecting a room for the habitat to reside, and the addition of plants.

In this section, we will provide an overview of lighting needs (for more complete information, see the Let There Be Light post) as well as watering and misting systems. Additionally, appropriate climate control monitoring equipment is explored to make sure the environment is comfortable for your chameleon.

Lightingchameleon-1240928

To ensure the health of your chameleon, certain lighting must be included in the enclosure. Aside from having enough light in the space to simulate the changes between night and day, your chameleon’s enclosure will likely need a UVB light and a basking bulb.

Chameleons, like people, need vitamin D. The easiest way to meet this need is through contact with UVB light. While UVB light naturally occurs in sunlight, having an enclosure indoors may limit the amount that the chameleon actually receives. By including a UVB light that is focused on the enclosure, you can make up for what is not present in the space.

Your chameleon needs approximately 10 to 12 hours of exposure to UVB on a daily basis. Often, the easiest way to meet the time requirement is to have the light on during the day and simply turn it off at night. If you want to make the process easier, you can event set the light on a timer, so that it automatically turns on and off at the correct intervals even when you are not home.

Basking bulbs provide an additional heat source in the enclosure. While you should ensure your room is kept at an appropriate temperature at all times, the basking bulb gives your chameleon an extra warm spot to help regulate their overall body temperature. In contrast to the UVB light, which should cover the vast majority of the space, a basking bulb only needs to heat a specific area.

As with the UVB bulb, basking bulbs should also be turned off at night. This allows your chameleon to feel the extra warmth traditionally experienced during the day time, while also simulating the cooler nights they would have in the wild.

Watering and Misting

If your enclosure includes live plants, then you will need to make sure and meet their watering needs. Each type of plant may have different requirements, but care instructions are often included when the plant is purchased. You can choose to hand-water plant soil as needed, or check into automated watering systems.

Misting systems benefit your chameleon directly. Unlike many animals that drink from water bottles or dishes, chameleons get their water off of the environment. In the case of enclosures, this often refers to droplets collected on plants and surfaces as the result of misting the space. Not only is this required for needed humidity, but it also provides a necessary source of fluids for your chameleon.

You can mist an enclosure by hand using a suitable spray bottle, but investing in an automated misting system may be wise. This ensures that all of the misting needs are met whether you are home to manage the task or not. You can set the misting system to spray at specific intervals, creating a routine upon which the chameleon can rely.

Climate Controls

It is critical to check the temperature and humidity levels on a regular basis to ensure all of these needs are being met. This means you will need to invest in a thermometer to watch the temperature, and a hygrometer to monitor humidity.

thermometer-428339While most home heating and air conditioning systems have thermostats, you still need to check the conditions within the enclosure itself. This helps you compensate for variances based on the enclosures exact locations within the home. For example, a habitat near a window with direct sunlight might actually get warmer than the temperature set on a thermostat. Investing in a high-quality thermometer specifically for the enclosure ensures your chameleon’s precise needs are being met at all times.

Once your lighting, watering and misting, and climate control systems are in place, you have all of the components required for a suitable chameleon enclosure. Research the specific needs of your chameleon’s breed to ensure the environment is kept in a way that meets those standards. Monitor the status of the habitat on a regular basis, especially when there is a significant or seasonal change in your home area. Then, you can simply enjoy your chameleon knowing that everything is set how it should be.

 

 

http://www.reptilesmagazine.com/Reptile-Health/Habitats-Care/Create-a-Habitat-for-your-Chameleon/

http://www.muchadoaboutchameleons.com/2012/04/how-to-set-up-proper-chameleon.html

No Place Like Home | Creating Your Chameleon Habitat Part 3

This is part three of a multipart series about creating an ideal habitat for your chameleon. The previous parts covered choosing an enclosure and selecting a room for the habitat to reside. This section is going to review how to “decorate” the space with branches, vines, and plants based on your chameleon’s needs.

Can You Take Me Higher

animals-1098679The majority of chameleons are arboreal; they feel safest when they are up high amongst the tree branches. That is why chameleon enclosures focus on height over width, and why you need to give them branches upon which to climb.

When it comes to climbing surfaces, you generally have two choices. You can go with real branches or vines and live plants, or their manufactured counterparts. Which method is best for you can depend on a number of factors which we will explore below.

The Genuine Article

If you want to help your chameleon feel at home in their enclosure, then having real branches and plants is a great way to go. Often, you can find suitable branch sections from a nearby tree, or at a suitably equipped pet store. Make sure the branches have a suitable amount of width, as tiny twigs won’t provide the support or gripping surface needed for your chameleon to climb, especially once they are full grown.

Branches

Before placing a new branch (that you find yourself) into the enclosure, thoroughly clean and sanitize the surface. You want to remove and dirt and debris, as well as loose bark on the surface. Additionally, you want only to include branches from trees or shrubs that are known to be NON-TOXIC. That means you may need to do some research before grabbing just any stick off the ground.

Once cleaned, you can cut the branch to a suitable size. In some cases, you can simply wedge them in place. At others, you may want to secure them to the enclosure with appropriate hardware. If you use hardware (like screws), make sure that they are not accessible to the chameleon. You wouldn’t like stepping on a nail sticking out of the floor, and your chameleon likely feels the same way.

If you choose to purchase branches from a reputable supplier, they will often be sanitized and scrubbed before you receive them. Some places will even cut the branches to length for you, saving you the trouble (especially if you don’t own suitable tools).

Vines

Vines provide additional climbing surfaces but are more flexible. This means you have more options in how they are placed. Finding suitable vines in your local environment may prove challenging, but long, flexible branches can also do the trick. As with the branches, cleaning and sanitizing are important, as well as confirming the vine material is non-toxic. For example, grape ivy may be a suitable choice, as well as flexible branches from a willow tree.

Plants

chameleon-384964When possible, using live plants is the way to go. Not only do they provide your chameleon with the shade and camouflage they may crave, but they can help hold humidity in the enclosure. They are also great for the air, especially when dealing with small spaces.

There are many suitable plants for use in chameleon enclosures. Some of the most popular choices include Ficus Benjamina, Umbrella Tree, and Pothos Plants. These may even be available at your local hardware or home improvement store, depending on your location and the current season.

When choosing plants, you want to make sure they are free of pesticides and fertilizers. You may have to repot the plants in a new planter with organic soil, and the exposed surfaces will need to be properly cleaned and sanitized. Often, this can be done with a clean bucket full of water that has a squirt of anti-bacterial soap mixed in.

Place the plant into the water “head down” without putting the roots in the solution. Swish the plant to make sure the solution reaches all of the surfaces, and leave it to sit for around five minutes. Then, thoroughly rinse the plant with clean water. Repeat the processes AT LEAST two more times before repotting the plant.

A Suitable Facsimile

Sometimes, managing live plants is overly complicated. For those occasions, fake plants can work as a suitable substitute. When choosing fake plants, make sure you pay attention to the quality. Often, it is unwise to simply grab some from your local craft store, as these were not designed for the rigors of having your chameleon walking all over them.

If you do want to work with fake plants, consider options designed specifically for reptile enclosures, and purchase only from reputable dealers.

Coming Soon!

This is part 3 in a multipart series focused on creating an ideal environment for your chameleon. Come back for additional advice to help you build your chameleon’s perfect home.

 

http://www.muchadoaboutchameleons.com/2012/04/how-to-set-up-proper-chameleon.html

http://www.reptilesmagazine.com/Reptile-Health/Habitats-Care/Create-a-Habitat-for-your-Chameleon/

http://www.chameleonsonly.com/index.php?p=page&page_id=Plants/Branches

http://www.tikitikireptiles.com/pages.php?id=8

 

No Place Like Home | Creating Your Chameleon Habitat Part 2

chameleon-63148This is part two of a multipart series about creating an ideal habitat for your chameleon. Part one focused on selecting the proper type of enclosure based on your local climate and chameleon’s need. This section is going to review where to place your enclosure once you have it purchased.

Choose a Room

Your first decision regarding the placement of your enclosure is the room in which it will be setup. While many people would initially think a common living area is the best option, it is not always the case.

First, you need to understand that chameleons can become agitated by their environment. Rooms on the main floor that are either high traffic or that allow outside noise to carry into the space can cause your chameleon to feel nervous or threatened. Repeated disturbances make it difficult for your chameleon to settle, and the constant stress can have a negative impact on his or her health.

If you have a multistory home, then selecting a low traffic room on the upper floor is ideal. Not only does the increased height help your chameleon feel more secure (this is based on the location of a window, which we will explore later in this piece), it likely has these auditory or visual disturbances. This means your chameleon is less likely to experience unnecessary anxiety based solely on the environment.

Second, you need to make sure the temperature in the space is well controlled. Chameleons are highly sensitive to temperature, and you need to make sure the room can provide the temperature range your chameleon needs to thrive.

Keep it Up

The base of your chameleon enclosure should not be on the floor. If you purchase a glass or screen habitat that does not come with a set of legs to raise it off the floor, then you will need to put the cage on a table to lift it off the ground. Make sure the table is broad enough to support the weight of the enclosure and provide reasonable stability based on the fact that the chameleon will move throughout the space and may cause the weight within the enclosure to shift slightly while doing so.

Find a Window

lobby-797961Just as you wouldn’t like to stare at the same four walls all day, every day, for the rest of your life, your chameleon wouldn’t like it either. To help create a more engaging environment, it is best to pick a room with a window. This also gives your chameleon the opportunity to experience sunlight on a regular basis.

East-facing windows receive the morning sun which can provide a gentler warmth, while west-facing windows will brighten up in the afternoon but often get warmer. Depending on which option you choose, you need to make sure the temperature needs of your chameleon are met throughout the day. Getting too hot or too cold is not a great way to live, so take care to monitor temperature changes so you can provide him or her with the extra warmth or shade your chameleon may require.

If you live in North America, south-facing windows actually get the most sunlight throughout the day. However, on hot summer days, it may make the temperature in the space uncomfortably high. You will need to take extra care to ensure your chameleon can escape from the heat of the sun when required to make a south-facing window work.

Coming Soon!

This is part 2 in a multipart series focused on creating an ideal environment for your chameleon. Come back for additional advice to help you build your chameleon’s perfect home.

 

http://www.reptilesmagazine.com/Reptile-Health/Habitats-Care/Create-a-Habitat-for-your-Chameleon/

http://www.muchadoaboutchameleons.com/2012/04/how-to-set-up-proper-chameleon.html

 

 

No Place Like Home | Creating Your Chameleon Habitat Part 1

chameleon-855125Before you bring your chameleon home, you must create a habitat suitable to its needs. While it may be tempting just to buy the first option you see, examining your options more carefully can produce better results. In this installment, we will cover information about the main types of enclosures that are available, and which may match your situation best.

Key Features for All Habitats

Certain features are ideal for any chameleon habitat. First, chameleons are arboreal and enjoy being able to get up higher. That means your enclosure will often be taller than it is wide. Additionally, you want to make sure the base of the enclosure is not actually on the ground. Your enclosure either needs to come with suitable legs or have the ability to be placed on a table or counter.

Drainage is also a concern as well as easy of cleaning. You want excess moisture to be able to quickly exit the living space, as well as any waste created by your chameleon. Even if you keep live plants in the habitat, drainage is always a concern.

Screened Cages

Screened cages are one of the standard options on the market. These enclosures have a frame, typically made of wood, metal, or plastic, and the frame supports the screens that prevent your chameleon from making a break for it.

The screens feature a relatively tight weave for multiple reasons. First, it prevents your chameleon from being able to reach through the screen. Even though many people would assume the design would only need to stop the chameleon from squeezing through, it is better to make sure that they can’t even stick a toe through the material. Aside from the risk of injury (should the chameleon get a toe stuck), it is also less likely to be damaged from your chameleon using it as a climbing surface.

mesh-443975Finer mesh also limits the ability of live food, such as crickets, from being able to escape the enclosure. Not only will this help keep the food in reach of your chameleon, but it also keeps in out of your home!

If you live in a hot, humid environment, screened cages make an excellent choice. First, they provide superior ventilation. This helps keep the enclosure from getting stuffy or musty as air can flow freely through the space. It also prevents the enclosure from becoming too hot based on heat retention from the material itself.

Terrariums and Vivariums

There are glass and acrylic terrarium or vivarium options that are suitable for chameleons as well. Often, these have solid sides made of glass or acrylic, a solid base, and a mesh or screened top. These options are also commonly available, though take care not to accidentally end up with a unit meant to be used as an aquarium as they may not come properly equipped and may not feature ideal dimensions.

These forms of enclosures can be ideal if your home is in a cold or dry environment. Glass and acrylic enclosures hold heat and humidity more effectively than screened cages. This allows you to create a more tropical environment without affecting your overall home environment as dramatically.

However, since temperatures and humidity can get quite high, and ventilation is more difficult with these enclosures (as it is commonly limited to the top only) you will need to pay particular attention to environmental readings.

Hybrid Enclosures

There are combination enclosures that feature a mix of glass or acrylic panels and screened sections. For example, the front of the habitat may be made of glass or acrylic, and the side may be half glass or acrylic and half screen. Some may even feature glass or acrylic panels that can be slide up or down to expose screened sections.

Hybrid solutions may be ideal if your weather varies drastically throughout the year. You can control ambient temperature and humidity more efficiently by adjusting the amount of ventilation based on current conditions.

Coming Soon!

This is part 1 in a multipart series focused on creating an ideal environment for your chameleon. Come back for additional advice to help you build your chameleon’s perfect home.

 

 

http://www.muchadoaboutchameleons.com/2012/04/how-to-set-up-proper-chameleon.html

http://chameleoncare.net/cage-habitat/

http://raisingkittytheveiledchameleon.blogspot.com/2007/12/enclosures-habitat.html

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Habitat-for-Your-Chameleon

http://www.reptilesmagazine.com/Lizard-Care/Building-Lizard-Cage/

 

Save the Pondo Dwarf Chameleon | A Look at Project Pondo

Herpetological Conservation International (HCI) is on a mission; a mission to save the endangered Pondo Dwarf Chameleon. This species is at risk due to its limited range. As the available habitat continues to shrink due to development in the Wild Cost region of South Africa’s Eastern Cape, HCI is looking to purchase available land that has been identified as the home of this wonderful chameleon species.

The goal is to maintain an environment that would protect the Pondo Dwarf Chameleon from extinction, and may be the first attempt to create a reserve specifically to save a chameleon.

Pondo Dwarf Chameleon Current Habitat

The Pondo Dwarf Chameleon is limited to a very specific area near Port St Johns, South Africa. The land is currently unprotected, leaving it open to development or use for agricultural purposes, a common threat due to increased urbanization in the area.

The area being sought for purchase is part of the Wild Cost, a section in the Eastern Cape region of South Africa. The environment is known as “Afrotropical,” referring to the unique coastal forest properties. Currently, the eco-region is considered endangered by both the IUCN and WWF.

The Goals of Project Pondo

HCI intends to purchase available land that is known to be inhabited by the Pondo Dwarf Chameleon. This allows the land to be set aside, creating a safe reserve for these wonderful creatures to thrive. Surveys have been completed to ensure that the targeted properties are currently inhabited by the chameleon, ensuring each purchase provides a benefit to the species.

As land is secured, the hope is to partner with local researches to perform various ecological studies. These studies would allow participants to be better informed regarding the species needs, and will aid in any habitat restoration attempts.

Other Benefiting Species

The region is also host to a number of other endangered animal species. The species would also benefit from the purchase and preservation of the land:

  • Giant Golden Mole
  • Samango Monkey
  • Spotted Ground Thrush
  • Cape Parrot
  • Pondoland Cannibal Snail
  • Pondo Flat-Necked Shieldback
  • Transkei Shieldback
  • Castleton’s Flightless Katydid

The reserve would also help the endangered Pondo Weeping Thorn.

Financial Goals

To complete this ambitious mission, HCI is looking to raise the required project budget of $50,000. HCI is a registered 501c(3) public charity. All donations made to the cause re tax deductible per federal law.

Would You Like to Help Save the Pondo Dwarf Chameleon?

If you would like to help Project Pondo reach their goal, see their Member Plant campaign page.

More information can also be found on the HCI website, as well as the HCI Facebook page.