A Rare Hatching! Canvas Welcomes Baby Jeweled Chameleons

While every successful birth is a wonder to behold, Canvas Chameleons had the opportunity to welcome a fairly rare event at the beginning of the month: the hatching of a few Jeweled Chameleons (Furcifer Campani). This is only our fourth line of unrelated captive births of these wondrous creatures. So, in celebration, we thought it was appropriate to bring additional information to our readers about this unique event.

Getting to Know Furcifer Campani

Furcifer Campani, also known as the Jeweled Chameleon, is a native to the country of Madagascar, living within an approximately 5,600 square mile section from Ankaratra to the Andringitra National Park. Traditionally, these chameleons are fairly small. At birth, they are often a bit less than an inch long and only reach around 5.5 inches in length once full grown. They also feature distinct coloring and markings that make it fairly unique within the chameleon family.

Most Jeweled Chameleons vary in color from a pale green to a dark brown, with three well-defined lighter bands running along the length of the body. Along with the bands, these chameleons feature numerous light-colored spots across the body and, in some cases, a section of red spots on the head.

The successful hatching of Jeweled Chameleons is a rare event in captivity. Part of the reason for the rarity is the fact that the export of these chameleons from Madagascar is no longer permitted, so not many breeders have the opportunity of enjoying the company of a Jeweled Chameleon, let alone the chance to witness a successful birth. Additionally, the incubation period can reach around nine months, which is a long period of time for maintaining the ideal conditions required for the young to be born.

Status of Jeweled Chameleons in the Wild

At this time, the Jeweled Chameleon is considered vulnerable as a species based on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. This is partially due to the fragmented nature of the population as well as the decline in the quality of their habitat. Much of the area where these chameleons are found naturally is subject to slash-and-burn agriculture, causing some habitat to be lost to the associated damage while the rest is lost to development.

Additionally, the population is still considered to be decreasing. This means it risk level could change in the future should the number of Jeweled Chameleons in the wild continue to decline.

With that in mind, we are honored to be able to bring information about this magnificent species to our visitors and hope you get a chance to appreciate one of the newest additions as shown in the video here.

 

 

http://reptile-database.reptarium.cz/species?genus=Furcifer&species=campani

http://www.arkive.org/jeweled-chameleon/furcifer-campani/